View customer testimonials and case studies from some of the Molloy Group’s happy customers

Chris Mitsos

Vice President,
MountainView Tire
 

“You promised to make a fundamental change in the way we approach each sales opportunity both on the phone and at the front counter. You said it wouldn’t be easy and we might only “reach” 75% of the sales associates. Well, you were wrong about one thing; we reached 90% of the associates, not the 75% you promised. We are extremely satisfied and excited about what the future holds for Mountain View Tire & Service Inc. We now have a cohesive sales plan when we open up the stores each day. The Molloy BDG Dashboard is a huge reason why your program is so effective. We can measure ~ in real time ~ exactly how each sales associate is progressing. It’s easy to use and equally as easy to implement at the store level. The recorded phone calls leave no doubt about how effective the program is and the coaching calls help sure up sales associates who are still struggling.  We look forward to a prosperous relationship with you for years to come.” 

Customer Satisfaction 

“The first program I’ve seen that has it all together! We are all in!” Danny Smith – Same Day Auto Repair – Tire Pros, Tulsa, OK. (5 stores)

“Dan Molloy has helped us over the last decade to become a Listening and Commitment based company. It’s has transformed our operation in profound, positive and lasting way!” – Chris Mitsos – Mountain    View Tire, Rancho Cucamonga, CA. (30 stores)

“Dan’s approach to training and learning has energized our entire operation. We have improved our results in a depressed economic market. I did not think it was possible. I am thrilled!” – Pat Smith – Pat’s Auto Repair – Tire Pros, Oklahoma City, OK. (4 stores)

Case Studies:

Pat’s Tire Pros and Same Day Tire & Auto Repair

The economy in Oklahoma has been a tailspin in recent years, most notably because of the severity and duration of depressed oil prices, with tire and automotive retailers among those feeling the drag.

Yet, because of a unique sales training program that they recently invested in, two local retail groups say they are beginning to see some sun between the clouds.

Pat’s Tire Pros, with stores in Oklahoma City for 35 years, and Same Day Tire & Auto Repair, with locations in and around Tulsa since 1996, independently began working with the Molloy Business Development Group, a New Jersey-based sales training and development firm, to help their sales employees communicate more effectively with customers.

The program started with the Molloy group using its proprietary call assessment tools to listen into its sales and customer service calls.  They followed this up with a rigorous training program that features Molloy’s “Power Training™” at its heart.  According to Dan Molloy, the president of  the sales training company, it’s a training system he’s designed over the past 20 years to help both major corporations and mom-and-pop shops become more effective on the telephone and in face-to-face meetings, whether it’s in interactions with customers at work or family members at home.

“Language is at the heart of everything,” says Molloy.  “We use language to create a clear vision for employees and customers.  It’s the foundation of leadership.  You create the mood of success by learning the words and the music.”

Power Training™, he says, is about building relationships, not just about selling products.  “Unless your people are able to create value in the promises they make, the assertions that back the quality of their work, and the declarations they make to the customer about the future, it all comes down to cost.  And, that’s not a position you want to be in.”

According to Molloy, regardless of what you’re selling, people will always ask about prices.  “However, what they’re really looking for when they call is someone they can speak with, someone who will listen and who maybe they can trust,” he says.  “Instead of providing trust, most businesses respond to callers by acting like a help desk and simply giving out price and technical information.  Competing solely on price is not the most effective way to sell a service or product. But how do you invent a new relationship and a new future for the prospect in under a minute?”

Molloy’s Power Training™ concepts and communication models were taught to the sales staff at the two Oklahoma retailers through live classroom workshops, live online video sessions and through pre-recorded online classes.   Molloy’s team conducted continuous measurement of their performance over several months, and observed dramatic improvement for both clients. Most importantly, this carried over to the bottom line.  Here’s a look at the impact the program had at each of these clients:

Pat Smith, the owner of Pat’s Tire Pros, has long viewed sales as his company’s Achilles Heel. “When I had only one store (today he has four locations) and was up at the sales counter, because I was owner who was invested in the business, I felt that I connected with people and could makes things happen,” he says.  “But, as I expanded, and as I removed myself from the counter and into the back office, that was hard to transfer to my sales employees.  It became difficult for me to listen to transactions, especially on phone transactions, on recorded calls, and hear a lack of energy and lost sales.  I felt if I could just get these people in here and get the energy up, where customers are comfortable coming to my shop, and where they walk out with a ‘wow factor,’ that the rest would take care of itself.”

He was frustrated on how to boost that energy.  “I tried training people myself, but that’s not my forte.  I needed something in an organized fashion, a process that could be put in place.”

He had previously sent staff to a management success training program in California and had invested in Dale Carnegie courses.  In each case, he found that the enthusiasm and effectiveness of the programs waned over time. “After a few weeks diminishing returns begin to set in, and you end up where you were before,” he recalls.

What drew him to the Molloy program was two-fold.  “With Molloy, it’s not about selling tires or auto services, it’s about communication, which I’ve always felt is the crux of the whole deal,” says Pat.  “You’ve got to learn to communicate with people, be empathetic and make them feel comfortable with you before they’ll even start to buy.  That’s number one, and number two is the follow-up, where we get closing percentage reports every week and see who’s not closing on alignments and who’s not closing on brakes, and who’s doing a great job.  The measurement continues even after the training is completed.”

While the program is still in the early stages, Pat says he’s feeling very optimistic about the business – for the first time in a long time.  “We’ve been in a three-year dumpster basically.  We’re in the middle of Oklahoma and oil prices have been horrible for the last two and a half years and that greatly affects our business.  Yet, with two days to the close of the month [May], I’m already seeing an increase over last year, which is probably the first sign of optimism I’ve had in the last 18 to 20 months.  And the only thing I’ve done differently is the Molloy program.”

In fact, he believes that by fixing what he considers the “weak link” in his business, his goal of increasing his revenues in the next several years from $5 million to $7 million is “doable.”

“Once I get my guys on board and doing it right, it’ll be the same difference between playing college ball and professional ball,” he says.  “There’s not a whole lot of difference between the two, but, gosh, there sure is a lot of difference.  You know what I’m saying.”

Danny Smith, no relation to Pat, has grown his business from a single location and $300,000 to $400,000 in revenue, to as many as seven locations [he now has five] and about $6 million in revenues.

Like Pat, he felt that even though he was personally effective in selling his services, he realized he needed help in instilling this skill in his sales team.  “I figured let the auto mechanics be auto mechanics, and let the sales training guys be sales trainers,” he says.

Investing in sales training was done for a simple reason:  to help him stay ahead of the competition.  Language, he knows, can motivate and help convince people.  With this at the heart of the Molloy program, it didn’t take him long to become an advocate.

“We’ve been working with Dan for about 90 days, and I’ve got one shop that’s up 27 percent right now,” he says.  “It’s been ‘Steady Eddie’ for 10 years in this store, and for it to jump like that, where we haven’t changed out marketing or the face of the building, it can only be attributed to the program and the fact that the guy who’s running it for me has bought in. Instead of coming in and punching the clock and doing his job, he has totally embraced the Molloy process.”

Danny is confident, as a result of the new sales training, that 30 percent growth is possible over the next two years.

“I’m excited as hell about the future,” said Danny, a well-known sprint car racing driver in the region.  “This is probably the single easiest thing that I’ve ever done for the business.  I’ve invested in a lot of things over the years, different programs and equipment, but I haven’t seen anything where the return on investment was exponential and the ease of implementing was so tremendous.”

Case Study: McLea’s Tire and Automotive Centers

RE-ENERGIZING A COMPANY

EXPERIENCE SUCCESS BY FOLLOWING ‘LANGUAGE OF COMMITMENT’

Les McLea and his brother Rick get unsolicited calls from potential vendors every day.  The owners of McLea Tire and Automotive Centers, with four locations in northern California, have heard pretty much everything.  Yet, when Les found himself on the telephone with Dan Molloy, president of Molloy Business Development, a New Jersey-based sales training and business development organization, he listened.

“We’ve been a successful company for a number of years, but recently we found ourselves pretty much cruising on automatic,” said Les McLea, whose company has been in business for 30+ years.  “When Dan started talking about how you can reinvent the future and improve the way you communicate with customers and each other, it resonated with me.  I got Rick involved; we met with Dan, and pretty quickly decided to move ahead.”

That was two years ago.  Since then, using Molloy’s Business Development Process and learning Molloy’s “Language of Commitment,” the brothers have seen significant increases in the three areas the company closely measures: how much money each store generates, how many cars are brought in, and how much each customer spends.

The relationship with Molloy began with implementation of Molloy’s CallMaxPlus™ system which provided for up-to-the minute monitoring of McLea’s advertising spend and the recording of subsequent sales calls received by its 40 representatives.

“We listened to their sales calls together for six months, accessing the language they used and grading their effectiveness with our patent-pending process. We pointed out new communications distinctions and taught McLea staff to communicate more effectively with our on-line System Of Learning™,” said Molloy.  “This included training, teaching and coaching them on learning the different moves and language for improving communication both with prospective customers and operationally between themselves.”

This meant establishing clear standards for effective communication and getting them away from answering the typical  caller’s question of “How much will it cost for a set of tires?” by spending 10 minutes talking about sizes and prices. Instead, according to Molloy, the dialogue was “interlaced with discussions on commitments designed to build trust and credibility (‘My name is Bill, I’ve been with the company for 24 years, and I promise you that I will give you the best service in town at fair price’), declarations designed to invent a new future (‘My only job is to become your car guy for life,’) and statements of fact (‘The technician you’ll be seeing is Jimmy.  He’s been with us for 18 years and is master certified in 10 different disciplines.’)”

Using its unique (patent-pending) system, Molloy’s team measured and compared the effectiveness of the calls based on such criteria as “building trust and credibility” and “generating action / commitment for the future,” The scores jumped dramatically over time, as did the productivity, financial performance and mood of the company.

In recent months, Molloy has licensed McLea’s to use a powerful branded advertising program he calls the ICHYWT™ (or “I Can Help You with That™”) branding program.  In addition to using this trademarked declaration in discussions with customers in all phone conversations, staffers wear pins with this newly licensed slogan. Additionally, McLeas store signage and the company’s radio and web ads also echo it. This simple yet powerful phrase has become closely associated with the company, and has helped improve the overall mood and energy, resulting in more sales.

“While most customers may call for prices, what they’re really looking for is someone they can speak with, someone who will listen and, most of all, someone they can trust,” said Molloy, who was a sales executive for many years before starting his company in 2003.  “Yet, all too often the telephone is where prospects are lost and advertising money is wasted.  Instead of providing trust, most businesses respond to callers by acting like a help desk and simply give out price and technical information.  Competing solely on price is rarely an effective way to sell a service or product.”

According to Rick McLea, “Our partnership with Molloy has transformed us into a listening and I Can Help You With Thatcompany”.

Case Study: Linden’s Propane

Unique Sales Training Process Provides Timely Boost at Linden’s Propane

Like an automobile dealership that sells the same Dodge Rams or Ford Explorers as its competitor, or a supermarket that offers the same containers of milk or packages of cold cuts as its cross-town rival, Linden’s Propane can’t distinguish itself on product.   After all, it’s all the same gas for heating.

 

“So what you’re trying to do is sell your name, your service and what you can provide as something beneficial to the consumer,” says Frank Edwards, general manager of Linden’s Propane, which has been serving north central Ohio’s residential, commercial and industrial communities for nearly 60 years.

 

To help him accomplish this, Edwards hired a sales training organization to take a hard look at how his employees respond to sales calls and give them the tools they needed both to differentiate themselves from their competitors and effectively close sales.

 

Edwards said he was familiar with the company, the Molloy Development Group, because of the reputation the New Jersey-based firm enjoyed with members of the Ohio Propane Gas Association.  “Once I met Dan (Molloy, the company’s president), I thought, ‘Well, this guy is very energetic much like myself, and I’d like to give him the opportunity to see what he could do for us,’” remembers Edwards.

 

The Molloy group uses its proprietary call assessment tools to listen into its clients’ sales and customer service calls.  They follow this up with a rigorous training program that features Molloy’s “Power Training.™”  This training system, designed over 20 years, helps both major corporations and mom-and-pop shops become more effective on the telephone and in face-to-face meetings, whether it’s in interactions with customers at work or family members at home.

 

“Language is at the heart of everything,” says Molloy.  “We use language to create a clear vision for employees and customers.  It’s the foundation of leadership.  You create the mood of success by learning the words and the music.”

 

Power Training, he says, is about building relationships, not just about selling products.  “Unless your people are able to create value in the promises they make, the assertions that back the quality of their work, and the declarations they make to the customer about the future, it all comes down to cost.  And, that’s not a position you want to be in.”

 

Molloy says that regardless of what you’re selling, people will always ask about prices.  “However, what they’re really looking for when they call is someone they can speak with, someone who will listen and who maybe they can trust,” he says.  “Instead of providing trust, most businesses respond to callers by acting like a help desk and simply giving out price and technical information.”

 

A Cool Response

Edwards admits that his employees were initially a little cool to the Molloy program.  “At the beginning, I would think that any group of people would see it as almost like Big Brother looking in,” he says.  “But once the platform was laid out, and the employees saw that it had nothing to do with judging you as far as what you’re doing, they understood there was no longer any reason to fear what calls were being traced and which one weren’t.  It was more a matter of saying, ‘If this individual is selling at a much higher rate than the others, what are they doing and let’s share it with the rest.’”

 

Three things provided by Molloy, says Edwards, have helped give his staff a decided advantage.  First, his staff receives an immediate text message or an email should there be a complaint or concern, allowing them to resolve the issue right away.  Second, they get feedback on the types of calls coming in, breaking down which calls became sales and which don’t, so they can better prepare for the appropriate response in subsequent calls.  Third, like football coaches watching actual game film, they get to actually listen to the calls and responses, from the introduction to the assumptive close.

 

In addition, Linder’s Propane staff has taken to heart greeting customers and prospects with the Molloy motto of “I Can Help You with That.”  “It might not always be the exact wording of ‘I can help you with that,” Edwards says.  “It’s the intent and the state of mind. This is what’s going to separate us from Ferrellgas and Sunrise (two competitors).”

 

According to Edwards, the sales training has impacted where it counts most – on the bottom line.  An 11 to 12 percent close rate, he says, jumped to 15 – 20 percent within a couple of weeks.  Today, the close rate is about double or triple what it was – which is particularly impressive in light of a winter that was one of the warmest in recent years.

 

“We have been able to increase margins by offering service, reliability, a comforting voice and someone who will listen and tend to your issues,” says Edwards. “We’re very positive about the future within our industry.”